Weekly Ramble Seven: Birthday + Vacation Slacking

Last week was my birthday week! Happy birthday to me! I bought myself some books, took two days off work, had my mom come to visit, played a lot of Breath of the Wild, and skipped writing for four days straight. Just let myself completely off the hook. Didn't even do any research reading. Sometimes you just need to allow yourself a vacation, you know? I'm not going home for the actual holidays, and will probably write most of those days since my husband will be working and I'll be at home alone (and oh so cozy and rested, seriously, after the year I've had staying home and writing sounds like this introverts dream), so this four day weekend was my 'holiday vacation' and I'm back and feeling pretty rested.

Still, I did get some writing done. I didn't cut anything and added 2,860 to Mendenhall for a total wordcount of 60,846. Plus I've got a pair of book reviews for you (even if one of them is v. v. short)!

The Fated Sky by Mary Robinette Kowal

I don't know what I could say about this second book in the series that I haven't already said about the first book in the series, except that I enjoyed it even more because we got to go to space. It's detailed. It's alternate history in space with a female, jewish protagonist, and it deals strongly with racism, sexism, and tons of science! I loved both books in this series, and if you haven't read the first, you should totally go back and read it. This series is completely worth it, and only gets better the more you read.

Rogue Protocol by Martha Wells

Look, Murderbot's not getting any less awesome, and may in fact be getting more so to the point where it might break your heart. Read these books!

Weekly Ramble Two: Alaska and Anxiety

I'm going to Alaska this weekend! Tomorrow morning (way too early), as of when this posts, actually. It's my first time taking a whole vacation completely alone. I'm thrilled. I'm terrified. The only sure thing is that it's going to be an adventure, and I couldn't be more excited. I saved up for this trip the whole time that I was writing the first draft of the novel (working title: Mendenhall) and soon I'll actually be able to look at the glacier (that won't be there anymore by the time the events of my story take place) that I got the working title from. Not in a picture but in real life! I'll be taking a ton of pictures, which I'll be sure to post somewhere so that this time next week you can see what happened on my crazy Alaskan adventure.

Because of the upcoming trip and this Monday starting my fourth week without exercise because I had open wounds on my face from a mole removal (nothing to worry about, I promise) and couldn't swim, the start of this weeks was a little rocky and anxiety ridden. However, I still got a fair amount of writing done, and I finally caved and spent half an hour on an exercise bike on Tuesday just to get some of those endorphins, which helped a ton. And tonight, finally, finally, I'm going for a swim. Hurray for healing!

Things are going well in my 'short' project, Sea Witch. I got bogged down in some dialogue and the introduction of a very important character this week (yes, that character), but pushed through to add 4,254 words to it for a total wordcount of 16,586 for the project so far. I think I'm almost at the halfway point, so my goal of keeping this 'not a novel' seems doable. I'm beginning to wonder if I should stick to my goal of starting revisions on Mendenhall on November 1 even if I haven't finished Sea Witch by then. It would be a shame, I think, to leave Sea Witch hanging when it would only take a couple of extra weeks to finish a first draft.

In any case, here are the books I reviewed this week:

A Colony in a Nation by Chris Hayes

If you're a white American, you need to read this book. It's short. It's easy to read. It presents the facts about the differences in policing between white and black communities, and the ways that these differences affect everyone, white and black, in America very clearly. We need to see what's going on in our own country; our own back yards, even, and this book is a quick, efficient way to get the basics down. Read it. You have no excuse.

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro

Never Let Me Go is a strange sort of book, and I'm not sure how much to write about it, because this is one of those few books that I feel like are enhanced by knowing very little about the premise, and sort of piecing it together as you go along. I can remember specific points of view where some small detail slipped into place and the whole world in the book crystallized around me, and seeing the puzzle pieces fall into alignment like that was part of the joy of reading this book. All I'll say, then is this: Never Let Me Go is a deeply atmospheric and troubling book, set at least in part in a english boarding school, and that it is highly science fictional in that it is asking some very big questions about our use of science and morality, even though at the outset it may not feel like it's that kind of book.

Whether you've been spoiled or not, this book is well-written, the characters are drawn with detail and care, and the atmosphere, as I said before, is subtle and troubling and perfectly rendered. It wasn't one of my favorite books ever, but I know a carefully crafted and precisely written book when I see one, and this is it. If you like that strange liminal space of science fiction that's pretending to not be science fiction, or if you like a precisely crafted atmosphere of unease, this book is for you.

Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly

Hurray for Hidden Figures! This book is exactly what I needed to read in a time when I was just starting to go down the road of "Wait, the history that I learned in high school isn't the whole story? Women and people of color were less likely to be written about? They did things? What?" It's the untold story of the African American women that served as NASA's calculators, and I am just so excited that this had come to light, and that I get to know about things like this, now.

That being said, the book is incredibly well-researched, and leans more on the research than storytelling or character work, which is obviously a valid choice for a nonfiction book, but makes for slightly less enjoyable reading, at least on my part. I imagine that the movie would fill in the storytelling and character work that I crave, so I better go watch that ASAP. For all that the book it a little dry, I enjoyed it, and I think that anyone willing to give this a shot will be glad that they waded through a little bit of research to get the knowledge that this book holds.

The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal

The Calculating Stars is the first book in an alternate history science fiction duology about what would have happened if a meteor hit Washington D.C. in 1952, devastating the eastern seaboard and causing climate change that necessitates humanity getting off of Earth and starting colonies on other planets ASAP. It's told from the POV of a Jewish calculator at NASA who also suffers from anxiety (anxiety-havers represent!).

I read this book almost immediately after reading Hidden Figures, and the pairing could not have been more perfect. Elma is such a wonderful main character, and Kowal does an amazing job of showing how a character that was marginalized in several different ways still manages to become one of the most important people in NASA's space program. It also deals with her privilege in relation to people more marginalized than herself, which I greatly enjoyed. Honestly, I enjoyed this whole book immensely, and would happily recommend it to anyone, whether you've read Hidden Figures or not. This would also be a great recommendation if, like me, you recently saw First Man, and wished we had seen, I don't know, any women working at NASA in the movie.

My Real Children by Jo Walton

This book hurt my heart in all the good ways and all the bad ways. It drew me in and horrified me, delighted me and broke my heart. Patricia Cowan has dementia, lives in a nursing home, and can remember living two very different lives. In one of them she married her college boyfriend when he made her choose now or never, and in the other she didn't. After that simple choice, though, her lives diverge drastically, as does the political state of the world around her. This book isn't your usual alternate history, and it's not a heavily plot-driven book. Instead it's more of a character study than it is anything else -- but such a compelling, careful, complicated one that I couldn't put the book down.

Read More

Taste of Marrow by Sarah Gailey

Sarah Gailey has done it again. Just goddamn gave me everything that I've ever wanted out of a book, and done it while all the characters are riding hippos. You heard me. They're riding hippos. In the Mississippi river. Hippos on the Mississippi, both being ridden by people, and running feral and killing and eating everything that moves.

Read More

Shadow of Night by Deborah Harkness

Warning: this review contains spoilers. 

I know that I have a lot of friends who love this series of books, and several of them have assured me that the third and final book is better than this second book, and that I will probably enjoy it a lot more than I did the second book. For that reason, and that reason alone, I will get around to reading the third book in this series. Eventually. If you're one of those people that loved this book, despite its flaws, you should probably leave now, with those assurances.

Read More

Glamour in Glass by Mary Robinette Kowal

I remember reading *Shades of Milk and Honey*, the first book in this series, on my honeymoon in Ireland. I found it charming, and with its premise of illusion-based magic in an Austen-like setting, it was exactly the right sort of book to read in a charming bed-and-breakfast in Galway, or for one memorable night, in an actual castle that had been converted to a hotel. I liked the book well enough, and figured that I'd come back to the series at some point. One thing led to another, and, well, it's been at least four years since my honeymoon, and I'm only just getting back to book two.

Read More

Everfair by Nisi Shawl

Oh boy is this book an *experience*. I mean that both in the best possible way, and in the way that warns you that this book is more interested in being a sensory experience and than anything action-heavy or plot driven. The writing in this book is luxurious - so luxurious, at times, that what is actually happening gets lost in whatever our current viewpoint character (and there are a lot of them) is currently feels or experiencing.

Read More